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Make your garden look more finished with our edging ideas

Whether you’re growing fruits and veggies or herbs and flowers, edging is the finishing touch for any type of garden.

Make your garden look more finished with our edging ideas

Whether you’re growing fruits and veggies or herbs and flowers, edging is the finishing touch for any type of garden. It’s like wearing the perfect pair of earrings to set off your favorite outfit! By placing edging around garden beds full of annual flowers and perennials, they’ll look more polished and your mulch will stay in place. Plus, it will add character and charm to your home’s curb appeal. For the best effect, look for edging that coordinates with the style of your house. For example, a classic saltbox looks best with traditional edging materials such as brick or stone. A more modern home looks good with the clean lines of metal edging.
And we’re not going to lie: Installing garden edging also takes some effort! It’s sweaty, dirty work, and it’s going to take at least a half day to install. Probably more! Get your tools together first, including gardening gloves, an edging shovel, garden spade, rake and kneeler pad. The good news is that if you do it right, your edging should last for many years.

Here are some of the best materials for edging your garden beds:

1. Plastic
Plastic isn’t glamorous, but it’s relatively easy to install. It’s available in short individual sections you pound into the ground or long rolls of edging, which require you to dig a trench in which to sink the edge.
Pros: Inexpensive and long-lasting
Cons: Not particularly attractive

2. Paver Stones
Pavers made from concrete are nearly indestructible. But they’re heavy to handle and time-consuming to install, so plan on a few days of heavy carrying and digging. You can make paths with pavers, or just use them for edging beds.
Pros: Lasts forever and very attractive
Cons: Time-consuming to install

3. Woven Willow
Also called “wattle,” this natural edge is perfect for English or country gardens. It’s used extensively in Europe.
Pros: Beautiful in the right setting
Cons: Easily damaged and pricey for large areas

* Source: https://www.countryliving.com/gardening/garden-ideas/g29816826/garden-edging-ideas/